This Woman’s Tiltled Uterus Made Her Baby Bump ‘Grow Backwards’

By now most of us know that pregnant women can carry differently from one another — some women have bigger baby bumps, some have smaller bumps, some barely show, and some gain weight everywhere. And all, it should be noted, are beautiful.

However, it’s an unfortunate fact that some people feel the need to critique moms-to-be who don’t show as much as the next pregnant woman.

Yiota Kouzoukas, a co-owner of online clothing store Sabo Skirt, was one of those women on the receiving end of criticism after she posted Instagram photos of her stomach while she was six months pregnant.

*BUMP SIZE* I receive a lot of DMs and comments regarding the size of my bump, which is why I want to explain a few things about my body. Not that I’m upset/affected by these comments at all, but more for the reason of educating in the hope that some people are less judgemental on others and even themselves. For the first 4 months of my pregnancy, my uterus was retroverted/tilted which means that I was growing backwards into my body rather than outwards. Most people with this type of uterus tilt forward at around 12 weeks and continue growing outwards like you normally would. My uterus didn’t “flip forward” until well into being 4 months pregnant because of the backwards tilted position paired with decade old endometriosis scarring that I have on my uterosacral ligaments. Basically, these ligaments are acting like anchors keeping my uterus “inside” rather than “outside”, which is why I appeared smaller than most people for the first 4 or 5 months. Now, at #6monthspregnant I’m growing forwards just like everyone else while the scarring on my ligaments slowly breaks down. My torso is also short and my stomach is naturally toned which is keeping my belly super tight, so I’ve had to personally stop all ab exercises to avoid any issues with possible ab separation. This is for me personally, as instructed by my doctor and is in no way a blanket rule for anyone else. I’m perfectly healthy, baby is perfectly healthy and that’s all that matters. Our bodies and bumps are all different and our shapes and sizes are all different too ❤️

A post shared by Yiota Kouzoukas (@yiota) on

In the caption of a photo she posted Oct. 9, Kouzoukas noted that she was getting comments on her “lack” of a baby bump.

“For the first four months of my pregnancy, my uterus was retroverted/tilted which means that I was growing backwards into my body rather than outwards,” she wrote. “Most people with this type of uterus tilt forward at around 12 weeks and continue growing outwards like you normally would.”

For the first four months of my pregnancy, my uterus was retroverted/tilted which means that I was growing backwards into my body rather than outwards.

She continued: “My uterus didn’t ‘flip forward’ until well into being 4 months pregnant because of the backwards tilted position paired with decade old endometriosis scarring that I have on my uterosacral ligaments. Basically, these ligaments are acting like anchors keeping my uterus ‘inside’ rather than ‘outside,’ which is why I appeared smaller than most people for the first 4 or 5 months.”

This photo is from 2 weeks ago at #25weekspregnant Throwback as I’ve been sick with migraines and haven’t been able to take any new pics. Thank you to everyone who messaged me with their own personal migraine cures ❤️My migraines are muscle/scar tissue related from multiple car accidents, so I usually stay on top of them with remedial massage, physio and regular exercise. Unfortunately due to being pregnant, I haven’t been able to stay on top of my management as well as usual so I’ve been down and out with migraines again. 4 days, lots of sleep, crying, vomiting and massages later, I woke up feeling great today! Let’s hope it stays this way ❤️ Anyone else suffer from migraines while pregnant that aren’t hormonal? PS. thanks @gkazoo1 for the endless neck and back massages

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A tilted uterus is actually fairly common, notes Carolyn Kubik, a fertility specialist, in BabyCenter. “In fact, having a tilted uterus is a normal anatomical variation, just like eye or hair colour. In most women, the uterus tips slightly forward (anteverted), toward the bladder, but in some women, it tilts backward (retroverted), toward the spine,” she writes, adding that a tilted uterus does not make it harder to conceive.

That being said, Kubik notes that a retroverted uterus could be caused by an underlying condition, and it’s this condition that can make it more difficult to conceive.

Bump update! 🙊#6monthspregnant and I’m overwhelmed with the amount of questions I receive about my pregnancy so far, so I’ll be sharing some more about it on my posts ❤️One of the most common things I’m asked about is MORNING SICKNESS. Yes, I had it from week 6-15. As someone who’s terrified of vomitting, it was my own form of hell expecting to vomit every morning 😭the only thing that helped subside the daily nausea was lemon + ginger tea and eating snacks very late at night so I didn’t wake up completely starving. Nothing I tried helped the actual vomitting but I was lucky that it was only once a day! Hopefully this helps some of you lovely ladies who are currently expecting and going through morning/night/all day sickness. Any questions, just ask 😊

A post shared by Yiota Kouzoukas (@yiota) on

According to Michael Cackovic, M.D., an ob/gyn at the Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, about 20 per cent of uteri are tilted and it’s impossible to tell if you have one unless you go through a pelvic exam or ultrasound.

While a tilted uterus can make bumps appear smaller, or appear later in the pregnancy, there may be other reasons why a bump may be smaller, for example if you’re taller or have strong abs, Cackovic explained to Self magazine.

All baby bumps, it should be noted, are beautiful.

And, as Kouzoukas noted on her Instagram post, despite having a small baby bump, she and her baby are doing well.

“I’m perfectly healthy, baby is perfectly healthy and that’s all that matters,” she wrote. “Our bodies and bumps are all different and our shapes and sizes are all different too.”

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Author: Chloe Tejada